Okay, so I didn’t know this was a thing, but I found out there is a National Fossil DayTM here in the States. It’s the Wednesday of Earth Science Week in October.

 

Now that is my kind of holiday. The idea behind it is to show how much we can learn about the past (and possibly predict about the future) from fossils and the need to understand and preserve them.

 

The National Park Service has some great art and articles as well as a list of related events-check to see if there’s anything going on in your area!

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A Tip of the Hat

Sir John's Hatter

Sir John’s Hatter

Today is Mad Hatter Day. (At least in the US. I guess it’d be June 10th in Europe.) Mad Hatter Day was inspired by Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland.

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When I was younger I was always annoyed that everything October was pink. October’s birthstones are opal and tourmaline. Opal being a pricey stone and not super cheap even in lab grown options, pink rhinestones were the way to go in key chains, toy rings, and other such birthday/astrologically themed trinkets.

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Blue Beyond the Sea

1539-cu-lapis

A piece of lapis with a wire work bail I made to echo its pyrite sparkles.

 

Lapis is sometimes considered a secondary birthstone to sapphire. That’s probably due to its brilliant blue color, and the fact that through the middle ages the word sapphire was used pretty loosely!

 

 

Lapis is a vibrant blue stone consisting of lazurite and usually pyrite and sodalite as well as a host of other minerals. It’s the pyrite that gives lapis its midnight sparkle of stars.

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The Autumn side of August

The green gemstone peridot is the most popular birthstone for August, but it has another, less gemmy birthstone, sardonyx. It seems fitting that one of August’s stones is all sparkle and leaf green, while the other is duller and browner and edging into fall.

 sardonyx

Sardonyx is a type of onyx that can be found in shades of browns and reds as mixed with black or white. It’s more common than black onyx (which is naturally bands of black and white-not solid), but since black onyx is a higher demand stone, sardonyx is often dyed black. The sard prefix probably comes from a Persian root for yellowish red. Its colors form very even and straight bands.

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Fake Pearls, Fashion, and Irritated Bivalves

I don’t generally read romances, but I stumbled on the Two Nerdy Girls blog back when I was researching French costume for a 17th century doll and I love it! They really dig into historical fashions and accessories-the fun fripperies that show us how little people change, but that history books tend to skip.

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One Last Emerald

It’s a little one! But I almost forgot, a warning about the time devouring dangers of pinterest. I saw a snake cuff bracelet that intrigued me and decided to try to make a ring version. And thus passed the day… So quick show-and-tell. Wire wrapped copper and emerald snake ring. About a size 8. I’d love to scale it down to make it a little less in the way, but haven’t had luck yet.

snake ring

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